Sunday, November 21, 2010

Bioenergy: recent UK Parliamentary answers



1. 

Biofuels

Energy and Climate Change

Written answers and statements, 18 November 2010

Photo of Julian Sturdy

Julian Sturdy (York Outer, Conservative)

To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what plans his Department has for the sustainable exploitation of bioenergy resources from the agricultural sector.
Photo of Charles Hendry

Charles Hendry (Minister of State (Renewable Energy), Energy and Climate Change; Wealden, Conservative)

Biomass heat and electricity could provide about 30% of the UK's 2020 target of 15% renewable energy (about 4.5%) of overall energy demand). Increased bioenergy deployment offers commercial opportunities for the UK's agriculture sector, which the Government are keen to see realised. Biomass resources include wood fuel from undermanaged woodlands; crop residues such as straw; waste resources such as manures, slurries, sewage sludge, waste wood and food waste; and purpose-grown perennial energy crops, such as short rotation coppice willow and woody grasses such as Miscanthus.
We are working to reduce costs and overcome barriers to deployment. Support to produce and supply biomass fuel is available for farmers and rural enterprises through the Rural Development Programme for England. We support the deployment of biomass electricity through the renewables obligation, and through feed-in tariffs for anaerobic digestion. We will support biomass heat through the new Renewable Heat Incentive from June 2011. These measures provide long-term revenue stability for investors and developers alike. Working with DECC, DEFRA aims to publish shortly a framework document for anaerobic digestion which will set out the steps Government consider need to be taken to increase deployment of this technology in England. This document will be the starting point for close collaboration between Government, industry and other interested parties.
It is essential that biomass fuel is produced sustainably. We intend to introduce sustainability criteria in April 2011 under the renewables obligation. The criteria will include minimum greenhouse gas emissions savings and restrictions to protect land important on carbon or biodiversity grounds.
http://www.theyworkforyou.com/wrans/?id=2010-11-18a.25004.h&s=biofuel


2. 

Biofuels

Energy and Climate Change

Written answers and statements, 18 November 2010

Photo of Julian Sturdy

Julian Sturdy (York Outer, Conservative)

To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what plans his Department has for the sustainable exploitation of bioenergy resources from the agricultural sector.
Photo of Charles Hendry

Charles Hendry (Minister of State (Renewable Energy), Energy and Climate Change; Wealden, Conservative)

Biomass heat and electricity could provide about 30% of the UK's 2020 target of 15% renewable energy (about 4.5%) of overall energy demand). Increased bioenergy deployment offers commercial opportunities for the UK's agriculture sector, which the Government are keen to see realised. Biomass resources include wood fuel from undermanaged woodlands; crop residues such as straw; waste resources such as manures, slurries, sewage sludge, waste wood and food waste; and purpose-grown perennial energy crops, such as short rotation coppice willow and woody grasses such as Miscanthus.
We are working to reduce costs and overcome barriers to deployment. Support to produce and supply biomass fuel is available for farmers and rural enterprises through the Rural Development Programme for England. We support the deployment of biomass electricity through the renewables obligation, and through feed-in tariffs for anaerobic digestion. We will support biomass heat through the new Renewable Heat Incentive from June 2011. These measures provide long-term revenue stability for investors and developers alike. Working with DECC, DEFRA aims to publish shortly a framework document for anaerobic digestion which will set out the steps Government consider need to be taken to increase deployment of this technology in England. This document will be the starting point for close collaboration between Government, industry and other interested parties.
It is essential that biomass fuel is produced sustainably. We intend to introduce sustainability criteria in April 2011 under the renewables obligation. The criteria will include minimum greenhouse gas emissions savings and restrictions to protect land important on carbon or biodiversity grounds.
http://www.theyworkforyou.com/wrans/?id=2010-11-18a.25389.h&s=biofuel


3. 

Biofuels: Feed-in Tariffs

Energy and Climate Change

Written answers and statements, 18 November 2010

Photo of William Bain

William Bain (Glasgow North East, Labour)

To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what levels of feed-in tariff he plans to adopt for the generation of (a) biogas, (b) biomethane and (c) electricity from anaerobic digestion.
Photo of Charles Hendry

Charles Hendry (Minister of State (Renewable Energy), Energy and Climate Change; Wealden, Conservative)

We expect to be in a position to announce the details of the Renewable Heat Incentive (RHI)scheme, including RHI tariffs and technologies supported, before the end of this year. This will include our decisions on biogas and biomethane.
Under the Renewables Obligation electricity generated by anaerobic digestion (AD) receives two Renewables Obligation Certificates (ROCs) per MWh. The feed-in tariff for electricity from anaerobic digestion is 11.5p per KWh for schemes of up to 500 kW and 9p per KWh for those between 500 kW and 5 MW.


[Ends]

http://www.theyworkforyou.com/wrans/?id=2010-11-18a.25239.h&s=biofuel

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Biofuels are a wide range of fuels which are in some way derived from biomass.

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